Agnimalya, SBPnB, Coming Kingdom January 2019 critique by Troy

Agnimalya January 2019 Critique
https://patreon.com/sharmishthabasu
By Troy David Loy https://www.amazon.com/author/troyloy

Efiles:
Detective Agni gets briefed on her target, and having gotten the testimony she needs, quickly brings down the villain. A fitting conclusion to this serial! It seems a bit heavy on explanation and light on action in places, but then this is a detective story, not an action story, and that’s often common for the genre.

The Scorpion Man:
Deathstinger wants a wife, but not of his people, the scorpion folk, instead a girl of the tiny Inchlines. He takes one from her home, but soon becomes angry with his choice!

His would-be bride grows despondent, listless, and is soon returned to her people by his own scorpion children. This one was interesting, and I’d like to see more of the Inchlines and Scorpion Folk in future stories.

Surya:
A young woman is traumatized, and kept in an orphanage after the death of her parents. Those responsible for her trauma are being killed, though, one by one, and her caretakers decide to find out how! Will they uncover something beyond ordinary explanation? I’d like to see this one continued, but I’m unsure that that’s the idea, as the ending is a bit ambiguous as to that to my reader’s eye.

The Argument:
A young girl faces a writing deadline, when she meets a pair of talking insects in competition demanding that she write about one of them. When one grows to enormous size, she suddenly gets an idea for her project, giant insect or not! This one was pretty cool, with a good narrative feel.

Coming Kingdom January 2019 Critique
https://patreon.com/sharmishthabasu
Critique By Troy David Loy @https://www.amazon.com/author/troyloy

The Dream:
An antique collector falls in love after a vision involving his latest purchases, and the girl of his, well, dreams. Literally. Some of the dreams’ content warn of murky doings, threatening the love of his life! Will he prevent the worst from happening to her? This one concludes nicely.

The Englishman:
Raktim and Chandra purchase a new home, one with a bad reputation, and a haunted past. What dark secrets lie hidden to be found? Who is the mysterious and ill-willed Englishman?

The Girl:
Raj and Mohana are childless, and desperately want to change that! Will Mohana’s wish for a child be granted in the wake of her strange nightmares?

The Village:
Chandralekha is taken to a place across a mountain pass, and sacrificed to a serpent deity for testing. Does she pass the test? Does she return home or fail, to become a slave forever? Good one!

Agnishatdal Chaitra 1425 Critique by Troy

Agnishatdal Chaitra 1425 Critique
By Troy David Loy @ https://www.amazon.com/author/troyloy
Agnishatdal Chaitra 1425, March 2019
https://shoptly.com/i/ext

Namaskar! This month, the last for BS 1425, the eZine starts with a digital painting by the Authoress of a young woman in traditional garb on a swing. I like the color palette chosen for this, heavy with cultural symbolism, as well as the definition of shapes, but the thing that stands out to me is the way the nose can be “seen,” instantly “filled in” by the viewer’s brain, simply implied by the way the rest of the face is shown. That’s a skillful use of technique in a
digital painting.

Rajeshwari Datta & Rama Majumdar: The entries for these two performers of Tagore’s music here give valuable snippets of personal history, plus good music lists of the songs they performed. While this is good, and worth a close look each time, I also like the earlier entries on other famous figures of history who made their marks on India and/or Bengal in other ways.

The next image shows a sitting young woman in pearls before a row of hedges or brush. The choice of skin tones, dress, and lip coloring go well together, as does the assortment of pearls around crown, neck, and arms.

The cook is a spy 2:
In the conclusion of Brian’s tale from his childhood, there’s both a good side and a bad one to this episode in his life. The good news is the relative well-being, though with some rough treatment, and safety, of the cook, Soriba. The bad is the fates of many of the family friends still living in Guinea two years after Brian’s family moved to Holland, a fortunate move for the family,
I think!

The Raja and the Swamiji:
A raja sees bad omens almost everywhere, and seeks the help of a swami to solve the mystery. After a brief misadventure with quickly dispatched bandits and a stone afterward, he gets an audience with the swami, one that leads him to suspect possible plotting against him by his own staff! This one ends well for the raja. Excellent, Raghu!

Home in the Heart:
Dom’s verse tells of an inner quest, a hunt both for and within the human soul, deep within a metaphorical heart, where he finds…What? Just read this one, much better than the doggerel I’ve written!

Haters 7 | Bitter Pill Dose 17:
BP ends this installment with advice on dealing with those who spread garbage by throwing it at others, the only thing they have to offer the world.

In this issue of the eZine is a mention of a new book by Freya Pickard: Kaerling 1 Silver Fire, the start of the adventures of the twins Otta and Erl, and a quest along the mysterious Unicorn’s Trail instigated by a wandering God. This one sounds good, like much of her other work! There are other books of hers mentioned as well, including “The Essence of Thyme” and
“The Rusalka Ritual & Other Stories!”

Who am I?
Zelda relates something about herself, the uncertainty and drift that happens when searching for who we are, who we “really” are, on a path that leads to more questions than definitive answers! I hope to read more by her in future issues!

Weep not:
Lisa this time has a quote picture of trees and the shadows they cast, and enjoins us not to weep for the contrast of the shadows.

This issue also has an invitation to a collaborative effort by Joshua Grant on his site, of indie authors seeking more sales of their works!

This issue further announces the soon-to-be-released Agnijaat and Agnishatdal Book(s) 9, the latter sharing works by Brian, the former due on the 7th of May! I’m looking forward to both!

Dirkbell, by Robert Sheriff:
A children’s book about a squirrel, this looks to be promising, as the hero seeks to resolve the matter of an unruly puppy and the cat he frightened away. Will be succeed?

YouTubia: Llama Arts:
The authoress discusses a cool YouTube channel for scary stories told with animation, so I did some poking about for the link, which is here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCw-
WWK1U5Nlds-ydZNCrkcg Zombie Alpacalypse or Llamageddon? Why not both! Do check this channel out, and pay no heed to my bad puns!

The authoress afterwards shares an article about the Indian Classical dance prodigy Mallika Sarabhai, and some commentary on actors Kevin Spacey and Morgan Freeman. While I don’t recall seeing much of Spacey’s work, I do remember Freeman as Alfred from Christian Bale’s Dark Knight movie with Heath Ledger as the Joker. Good stuff! There’s also a brief article on
Palghat R. Raghu, a professional Carnatic musician and percussionist. I’ll be looking up some of his stuff!

The Authoress gives her thoughts, and some information of Boul singer Amar Pal, and some commentary on the failure of Indian media market forces in selective promotion of artists!

This month’s recipe involves sautéed red chilli and boiled spinach, eggplant, and potatoes. This one might prove hazardous to cook in a contained space, with the chillis, but sounds really good for those with good kitchen ventilation and a love of spicy food!

This month’s Bengali and Hindi verses are each in their own categories, the first a divine tribute and both of them good!

So this is the month of Holi, the festival of Colors! I retroactively wish those who celebrated it the happiest of times this year!

The Authoress treats us to Pieces of Past, this time on the Bhakti saint Chaitanya Mahaprabhu, whom is seems had quite an effect in his time as a popular figure!

In this month’s Story from Ved and Purana, it’s the tale of a snake prince who becomes a human on the giving of a boon by Shiva. The fact that he was first cursed by Shiva in a previous birth is interesting, as it shows the need to keep a stiff upper lip when a God tells a joke, unless of course, the God wishes you to laugh as the punchline is directed at you!

Agnijaat Chaitra 1425 Critique by Troy

Agnijaat Chaitra 1425 Critique
By Troy David Loy @ https://www.amazon.com/author/troyloy
Agnijaat Chaitra 1425, March 2019
https://shoptly.com/i/ex3

Namaskar. This month’s opening painting shows two lovers playing Holi, one of the festivals for Chaitra! This appears to be Radha and Krishna at play during a moment together, perhaps the very first Holi to be celebrated!

Indie Author Speaks – Pocket Money or More 4
The Authoress discusses the difficulties of affiliate accounts and posting links for online retail sites! Especially with really big online retailers, keeping up profit flow and remaining in the good graces of the business are a must, or else!

There’s a cartoon afterward of a rather lusty toad king who is a little too fond of human girls in his harem! Perhaps his status as a toad is not literal, but a metaphor for a human with the manners and seeming of a toad, and morals matching that seeming.

Hinduism and India – 3:
The Authoress notes something about Hinduism, and it’s consolidation of power over Indian society that seems true of any powerful institution, like religion, when it joins forces with the state: any institution that has power is corruptible and can cause great harm as a result of that. But when religion and the state, each powerful institutions in their own rights, join as one over the whole of society, the potential and risk of corruption and resulting harm increases manyfold. It takes brave and intrepid people to combat this, and in a modern democratic republic, the mobilized political will of ordinary people to make change.

Era of Classics:
Here, the Authoress notes the decline of classic movies, and the sometimes successful, sometimes not, attempt to recapture their feel in modern films.

Indian Raga Now | Runa Laila
Here, we are introduced to a new singer, at least new to many of uis outside India, and after a quick web search I found a link to some of her music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=FYeIp_VjnoI This is a fun listen! There’s a strong echoic quality to the music, like a studio broadcast from an old-time late-night radio station, but that in no way detracts from the quality of her singing – it adds to it! The link may have expired, or not, but a quick search for her stuff online is relatively easy.

Spotlight On – Ameen Sayani:
The Authoress gifts us with a luminary of South Asian radio programming, from Radio Ceylon and All-India Radio. His programs archived online will make valuable listening!

Sweet Memories – Books:
Here we are treated to the love of books, not just e-books but those you actually hold in your hands and turn pages in. Books have a look, feel, and smell to them that sometimes e-books don’t! I agree.

Ramnavami:
Here, we are told about the festival of the Ramayana’s main hero, and the princely virtues he embodied. His devotion to duty would be the envy of many!

Theme for Chaitra: End:
Here, there are two images, a 17-word verse, a 7×2 diamond verse, a story about a widow and a ouija board, freeform verse, and a short essay, and it’s all about endings, of stories and of lives. This points out that to everything there is an end, as this Chaitra is the end of 1425!

So, that’ll be it for the conclusion of BS 1425. Next month, it’ll be time to tackle Agnijaat for the New Year, starting with the month of Boisakh 1426!
I’ll see you then, and in Soruggon: Talotaa frang. Talotaa kas. Talotaa tranga suulaat!

Agnishatdal Falgun 1425 Critique by Troy

Agnishatdal Falgun 1425 Critique
By Troy David Loy https://www.amazon.com/author/troyloy
https://shoptly.com/i/4jy
Agnishatdal Book 8, Saraswatipuja 1425
https://shoptly.com/i/4xi
Agnishatdal Falgun 1425, February 2019
https://shoptly.com/i/4jy

Vanakkam. This Chaitra, I give you something on last month’s Agnishatdal,

Let us begin…. Our virtual trip to India*
This shows a girl in traditional garb in rural forest surroundings, maybe someone of an adivasi ethnicity? This pic has a nice balance of light and dark shades, particularly the light tones of dress contrasting with the dark shades of her skin.

Malati Ghoshal:
As a student at Bethune college, trained in classical and Tagore songs, and best in those, it’s no wonder she was mentioned by the mentioned in the poems of some of the leading poets of her day. I’m putting looking online for recordings of her songs on my list of things to do for the weekend!

Pankaj Kr. Malik:
What an amazing career this man had, as an actor, singer, and songwriter! That he took on the work of popularizing Tagore’s songs and teaching them to that same public audience is something worth remembering him for. I’ll have to take a look at some of his work, maybe finding it online.

The cook is a spy
Brieuc tells of some of his childhood spent briefly in Africa, and the danger of its political situation, especially to foreigners, and to those suspected of spying against the ruling government! In this chapter, both sides engage civilly when the family cook is accused of the very same. I wonder how this turns out?

A tale of two Gurus:
Raghu tells the story of a raja with misplaced manners, who is taught a lesson on his meeting of a local guru, in a clever use of reasoning to inspire humility.

Just my imagination*:
Dom offers a short verse of one stanza, six lines, on a fleeting shadow, when suddenly its true source is revealed!

Haters 6:
BP tells of the poet Nazrul, who “won” the ire of dyed in the wool religious conservatives on both Hindus and Muslims for his heterodox spiritual views. The fact that he attained the role of Bangladesh’s national poet is a strong admonition to carry on despite the naysayers.

The unfaithful earl, Part 6:
Doug relates not one but two conclusions for this ghostly tale:
Conclusion one: a coroner’s examination revealed that the death of the girl was by natural causes…. Or was it??

Conclusion two: the local village vacates, the inhabitants and witnesses of the ghastly encounter die or move away to other locales, the pub closing its doors.
But not so fast! A closer examination of the scene of the girl’s deaths reveals hoofprints made using horseshoes of a style not seen for a millennium. What’s up with that??

Second not so fast! A metal collector finds an ancient spear and archaic armor at the sight with his detector. At this finding, he hears faint, high-pitched laughter, followed by a moaning sound as he leaves. A memorable ending!

Life love Wisdom*
Lisa’s photo meme features a bridgein dim lighting, with the text repeating the words, “life, love, wisdom, experience” in differing typeface sizes. This made an impression!

Congrats to the authoress in this issue for her first sold digital painting! It’s always good when others like your work enough to buy it!

Bro’s Birthday Cake*
Here’s a neat little pic of the authoress with her bro, having cake and eating it too! Many thanks to the authoress for displaying the New Year’s Day card I sent out!

Noreen had a nice New Year’s greeting as well!

Mrinalini Sarabhai:
Bharata-natyam is one of my favorite classical dance styles, and the fact that this lady could make it both popular and respectable is especially swoopy, “swoopy” because plain old “cool” is overused! Kudos to her!

Palani S. Pillai
As a drummer like his father that he learned to improve his performance style was probably key to his success doubtless contributed to the lifestyle he lived. With his prominence in the 1940s and 1950s, he was way before my time, but there should be something online I can listen to of his work!

True Treasures, M.R. James:
Now here’s a good writer, who used more traditional horror themes but in a style that gave it different feel to his stories. He also avoids the often blatant racism and xenophobia underlying Howard Phillips Lovecraft’s Weird Tale fiction, which is a huge plus when reading him. I also recommend seeing videos of James’ stories on YouTube, as there are a lot of them, and they’re scary as all get out!

Falgun Recipe: Shakbhaja:
This looks tasty, and I do like spinach, or my favorite sweet kale, along with the other veggies listed here. I tend to prefer my leafy veggies crunchy!

7 Bengali
Here’s a verse on Devi Saraswati playing her veena to sooth Devi Durga

7 Hindi
This verse has a warning about those whose toxic words flow too freely. Beware them!

Pieces o/Past: Surdas and Tulsidas:
Here are two prominent followers of the Bakhti movement, and the writings they are principally known for. Fascinating.

Story from Ved and Purana: Pippal Tirtha
To lose one’s parents, be raised by trees, and then given the power to destroy gods? Wow! That those same gods begged for protection from him, and afterward making amends for what they did is a story worth of a blockbuster film!

Well, that’s it for this Chaitra! I’ll be back next month to see you, but until then, in Soruggon…
…Talotaa frang. Talotaa kas. Talotaa tranga suulaat.
And in my currently amatuerish grasp of Tamil….
…Vanakkam.

Agnijaat Falgun 1425 Critique by Troy

Agnijaat Falgun 1425 Critique
https://shoptly.com/i/4jx
By Troy David Loy https://www.amazon.com/author/troyloy
Agnijaat Book 8, Saraswatipuja 1425
https://shoptly.com/i/4xg
Agnijaat Falgun 1425, February 2019
https://shoptly.com/i/4jx

Vanakkam. I hope this Chaitra sees you all well. I’ve this time critique of Falgun 1425’s Agnijaat, so let’s do this!

Shubh Shivratri*
Here’s a pic of Lord Shiva meditating, accompanied by one of his attendant ghosts while a girl nearby fasts, hoping for good husband.

From the Quill of Femme Sole: Fight for my right!:
Here’s cartoon using stick figures of women with misplaced priorities on both sides of a debate. Why the dichotomy? Why not both sets of rights?

Hinduism and India – 3:
The authoress notes that Hinduism’s history is one of flourishing by adaptation to create a rising tide that raises all proverbial ships, other religions in India, for benign coexistence rather than strife. Hinduism’s proponents ought not to make their own faith disreputable! I agree.

Words of the Wisest 20
I find the notion of using one’s weakness as a strength a novel idea, and a useful one if you know how to do it, though that indeed takes wisdom to figure out!

Indian Raga Now: Nazia and Zohaib Hassan
Two more performers to put on my bucket list! I’ve found a link to Nazia’s piece, Boom Boom, here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7ec26YuBUo

SPOTLIGHT ON – Simi Garewal
Actress and talk show hostess? She shares a few skills with a Britisher of Indian/Pakistani descent named Jameela Jamil whom I’ve watched before, suggested by Amita Patel on the podcast Inside Pop. Give them both a watch and a listen!
Sweet Memories – Ocean
I can sympathize with the authoress on this, and have good memories of being on the beaches in the next town over. Though in a world where we humans do nothing serious to avert climate change, rising sea levels are making coasts creep ever inland!

Shivratri
This festival suggests to me an old warning when wishing badly enough for something:you just might get what you ask for!

Theme for Falgun: Friendship
One: an image of two close friends, holding hands amidst the fires of hell.
Two: Two close friends coversing, each basking in the other’s company.
Three: ian image with verse of two women together, maybe on beach, maybe on rooftop, with the top of a palm frond in the background.
Four: 7×2 diamond verse, on the value of stalwart friends who support us.
Five: story of an injured sprite, found by a young girl, and recovered by its fellow faerie folk.
Six: Here’s verse on non-judgmental friends, who stay together in rough times.
Seven: This is a piece on the contrast between friends and lovers, and why friends are often better in the long term.

Fir Milenge*
This shows a girl standing at the shore of the ocean, watching the tide come in. I like the color palette used with this one!

Circle…. it never ends…*
This one uses an image of four oval framed pics, each with a girl’s hand holding flower blossoms of various sorts! This one stands out nicely!

That’s it for Chaitra, 1425! I’ll be back next month to review Agnijaat, and so, in Soruggon…
…Talotaa frang. Talotaa kas. Talotaa tranga suulaat.
And in Tamil……Vanakkam.

Agnishatdal Magh 1425 Critique by Troy

Agnishatdal Magh 1425 Critique:
By Troy David Loy https://www.amazon.com/author/troyloy
https://shoptly.com/i/86t

Greetings, O readers! It’s Falgun, so here’s the latest in a not-so-new series of critiques, noting what stood out, what’s new or updated, and what I liked. I’ll even throw in some questions on these as well, as this is a critique after all! So, let us begin!

Kanika Banerjee:
A renowned student of Tagore songs, even with her most popular tune not actually from Tagore himself, she made a good career from her skills, though was taken from life in her seventies, too soon in my estimation. Along with Kanak Das, and the differing vocal styles they used,

The Little Boy and the Tiger, P. 5
Brian ends this serial with more of the brief part of his life in Cambodia, and from years later the revelation of the baby tiger. I too hope Petite-Ami lives still, a survivor of the terrible regime that dominated his country! A fitting conclusion.

Brahma Rakshasa 4:
Raghu gives a good ending to this piece, with the final fate of the Rakshasa, the curious music played by the villagers in the demon’s absence, and hints of a possible link to the ancestry of the unnamed visitor to the village…. Could it be? Good job, Raghu! I enjoyed seeing this play out!

Deeply in a fog*:
Dom offers a short verse of a wish for sunny weather despite pea-soup dreariness in the day! Coolness!

Haters 5:
BP discusses the vileness of Raja Rammohan Roy’s critics, defenders of a horrible system he rightly had banned. I hear the same thing from intellectually dishonest types who try to defend American slavery, even more than a century after a bloody civil war that they lost!

Budapest Missives:
Juliette offers a striking image in warm colors, of statuary with the full moon behind it. Quite good.

The unfaithful earl, Part 5:
Doug relates a tragic end for one of the Americans in this ghost story, the only casualty of a haunted glen other than the shade of the earl himself! Never bring drugs and a heart condition to a ghost-fight!

What is within my grasp*
Lisa gives here a cool quote-pic that could show either dawn or dusk. Beautiful nonetheless!

YouTubia: Camengat!
Ooh! This looks interesting! I love both astrophotography and conceptual paintings of planets for both sci-fi movies and early space paintings made before we sent probes to the planets!

Birju Maharaj:
It’s always good when truly gifted innovators revitalize and repopularize a field, and especially the art of dance and dance-drama. This was a brief piece, but enjoyable!

Efiles from Agnimalya Patreon:
Detective Agni continues her investigation, and finds her client has made many enemies, enemies who want to settle a score!

Saraswatipuja*
This image shows the Goddess Saraswati sitting with her veena and a swan nearby. I like the color palette for this one and simplicity of form!

Republic Day*
An image celebrating the founding of the Republic of India. This one is very economical with color, form, and arrangement. As the text says, Jai Hind – from the US!

Pieces of Past: Dadu Dayal:
An interesting piece of medieval Indian history, and worth looking up in greater detail. The authoress has provided useful clues to do so. Spiritual leaders tend to live interesting lives, and advocate interesting ideas.

Story from Ved and Purana: Ila Tirtha:
Cool! Here, a king has a complicated… transition in life… after entering a magical forest. This was a fun read on several levels as an ancient narrative!

Ponga Pandit: Evil Teacher:
Here’s a cartoon of an instructor who uses his skills to serve dark ends, indoctrination rather than education.

So, that’s it for Magh’s Lotus of Fire issue! I’ll see you again after Falgun with the next critique, and in abbreviated Soruggon….
Tf. Tk. Tts!
*sigh* Take care regardless!

Agnishatdal Magh 1425 Critique critique by Troy

Agnishatdal Magh 1425 Critique:
By Troy David Loy https://www.amazon.com/author/troyloy
https://shoptly.com/i/86t

Greetings, O readers! It’s Falgun, so here’s the latest in a not-so-new series of critiques, noting what stood out, what’s new or updated, and what I liked. I’ll even throw in some questions on these as well, as this is a critique after all! So, let us begin!

Kanika Banerjee:
A renowned student of Tagore songs, even with her most popular tune not actually from Tagore himself, she made a good career from her skills, though was taken from life in her seventies, too soon in my estimation. Along with Kanak Das, and the differing vocal styles they used,

The Little Boy and the Tiger, P. 5
Brian ends this serial with more of the brief part of his life in Cambodia, and from years later the revelation of the baby tiger. I too hope Petite-Ami lives still, a survivor of the terrible regime that dominated his country! A fitting conclusion.

Brahma Rakshasa 4:
Raghu gives a good ending to this piece, with the final fate of the Rakshasa, the curious music played by the villagers in the demon’s absence, and hints of a possible link to the ancestry of the unnamed visitor to the village…. Could it be? Good job, Raghu! I enjoyed seeing this play out!

Deeply in a fog*:
Dom offers a short verse of a wish for sunny weather despite pea-soup dreariness in the day! Coolness!

Haters 5:
BP discusses the vileness of Raja Rammohan Roy’s critics, defenders of a horrible system he rightly had banned. I hear the same thing from intellectually dishonest types who try to defend American slavery, even more than a century after a bloody civil war that they lost!

Budapest Missives:
Juliette offers a striking image in warm colors, of statuary with the full moon behind it. Quite good.

The unfaithful earl, Part 5:
Doug relates a tragic end for one of the Americans in this ghost story, the only casualty of a haunted glen other than the shade of the earl himself! Never bring drugs and a heart condition to a ghost-fight!

What is within my grasp*
Lisa gives here a cool quote-pic that could show either dawn or dusk. Beautiful nonetheless!

YouTubia: Camengat!
Ooh! This looks interesting! I love both astrophotography and conceptual paintings of planets for both sci-fi movies and early space paintings made before we sent probes to the planets!

Birju Maharaj:
It’s always good when truly gifted innovators revitalize and repopularize a field, and especially the art of dance and dance-drama. This was a brief piece, but enjoyable!

Efiles from Agnimalya Patreon:
Detective Agni continues her investigation, and finds her client has made many enemies, enemies who want to settle a score!

Saraswatipuja*
This image shows the Goddess Saraswati sitting with her veena and a swan nearby. I like the color palette for this one and simplicity of form!

Republic Day*
An image celebrating the founding of the Republic of India. This one is very economical with color, form, and arrangement. As the text says, Jai Hind – from the US!

Pieces of Past: Dadu Dayal:
An interesting piece of medieval Indian history, and worth looking up in greater detail. The authoress has provided useful clues to do so. Spiritual leaders tend to live interesting lives, and advocate interesting ideas.

Story from Ved and Purana: Ila Tirtha:
Cool! Here, a king has a complicated… transition in life… after entering a magical forest. This was a fun read on several levels as an ancient narrative!

Ponga Pandit: Evil Teacher:
Here’s a cartoon of an instructor who uses his skills to serve dark ends, indoctrination rather than education.

So, that’s it for Magh’s Lotus of Fire issue! I’ll see you again after Falgun with the next critique, and in abbreviated Soruggon….
Tf. Tk. Tts!
*sigh* Take care regardless!